summer interns’ pin boards :)

@2 years ago
#Muscarelle #Muscarelle Museum of Art #William and Mary #Internship #Art Internship 
Intern Feature: Development and Media Intern
If you’ve ever wondered what it’s like to work in the Muscarelle Museum, then today is your lucky day. I am the Development and Media Intern and the newest intern to join the ranks of the Museum Staff! There are six of us in total; three recent William and Mary graduates, two Juniors, and me, a rising Sophomore.
 On a typical day, I show up to the DEN (which stands for Development, Education, and New Media) office at the crack of 9 a.m. I have my very own computer in front of the designated Quote Wall, which highlights pieces of wisdom such as “The most important thing is to be yourself. Unless you can be batman. Always be batman.” With inspiration like that, it’s hard not to be productive. As the Development and Media Intern, I am in charge of all things related to marketing and advertising, though sometimes I get other random assignments like designing a website or helping the President’s Office move. Most of my work is done on Microsoft Excel, and my current assignment is to document all of the media outlets in Virginia and the surrounding states. I’ll work for a few hours before taking an hour off for lunch, which is usually when I try to cook things and fail miserably. After lunch, I either go back to working on my assignments, or attend meetings with my boss and fellow interns until it is time to go home.
Working at the Muscarelle is certainly no walk in the park, but it is definitely a lot of fun. My bosses, Amy and Christina, go out of their way to make sure that we are well-fed, educated, and employable after graduation. Last month they threw us an ice-cream sundae party, complete with 20 different toppings and 5 flavors of ice cream (apparently Food Lion was having a sale—buy 2 get 3 free). We’ve had pizza parties, visits to the career center, field trips to the Brafferton, and next week is our end of summer cookout.
I am absolutely sad that the summer is ending and half of the interns are departing for the real world.  The Museum has been great to all of us. Of course, I hope to keep working here until I graduate in 2015, but nothing can compare to that first summer, when you show up terrified on your first day and leave realizing you had nothing to fear at all.
 Written by Skyler Paltell, Development and Media Intern

Intern Feature: Development and Media Intern

If you’ve ever wondered what it’s like to work in the Muscarelle Museum, then today is your lucky day. I am the Development and Media Intern and the newest intern to join the ranks of the Museum Staff! There are six of us in total; three recent William and Mary graduates, two Juniors, and me, a rising Sophomore.

 On a typical day, I show up to the DEN (which stands for Development, Education, and New Media) office at the crack of 9 a.m. I have my very own computer in front of the designated Quote Wall, which highlights pieces of wisdom such as “The most important thing is to be yourself. Unless you can be batman. Always be batman.” With inspiration like that, it’s hard not to be productive. As the Development and Media Intern, I am in charge of all things related to marketing and advertising, though sometimes I get other random assignments like designing a website or helping the President’s Office move. Most of my work is done on Microsoft Excel, and my current assignment is to document all of the media outlets in Virginia and the surrounding states. I’ll work for a few hours before taking an hour off for lunch, which is usually when I try to cook things and fail miserably. After lunch, I either go back to working on my assignments, or attend meetings with my boss and fellow interns until it is time to go home.

Working at the Muscarelle is certainly no walk in the park, but it is definitely a lot of fun. My bosses, Amy and Christina, go out of their way to make sure that we are well-fed, educated, and employable after graduation. Last month they threw us an ice-cream sundae party, complete with 20 different toppings and 5 flavors of ice cream (apparently Food Lion was having a sale—buy 2 get 3 free). We’ve had pizza parties, visits to the career center, field trips to the Brafferton, and next week is our end of summer cookout.

I am absolutely sad that the summer is ending and half of the interns are departing for the real world.  The Museum has been great to all of us. Of course, I hope to keep working here until I graduate in 2015, but nothing can compare to that first summer, when you show up terrified on your first day and leave realizing you had nothing to fear at all.

 Written by Skyler Paltell, Development and Media Intern

@2 years ago with 2 notes
#Muscarelle #Muscarelle Museum of Art #Intern Feature #Museum Internship #Art Internship #Art #William and Mary 
Whether you call it déjà vu, serendipity, or coincidence, we have all had those moments when our experiences echo through different aspects of our lives. What we see in one part of our lives is sure to manifest in another, and nowhere is this phenomenon of manifestation more prevalent than in art. 
When we first launched our new blog, we had the great idea to for our staff to contribute by sharing some of their favorite art works and artists. But since different artists choose to create different echoes from varied and meaningful aspects of life, how do you choose just one? Surely you can’t pick only one favorite artist! My mind immediately whirled with possibilities, and certainly in my top 10 artists of all time is Michael Kenna, an extraordinary photographer. As coincidence would have it, Kenna has just released his latest series, based on Thomas Jefferson’s time as a minister to France in Paris!
Jefferson, being an alumnus of William and Mary as well as a Founding Father, is hugely important to the College. Jeffersonian history remains a vital part of the campus today, and of course Swem Special Collections and the Muscarelle Museum have some of the most significant writings and works from or about Jefferson in their archives. Kenna, invited to visually retrace Jefferson’s footsteps in Paris from 1784 to 1789, has contributed his own unique touch by “adding a new visual record to this fascinating chapter in French and American history” in his latest publication, Thomas Jefferson’s Paris Walks.
Kenna’s work produces a calm in an otherwise noisy world. He has reinvented landscape photography by capturing the graceful movements and quiet stills of life simultaneously. His mastery of manipulating the atmosphere when capturing available light often creates a dreamlike quality to his works. While much of his work contains nature, there is often that small imprint that reminds of us of a human presence in the environment. His compositions are always exquisite, but it is in the subtleties of his work that the beauty emerges. One of my favorite pieces is from his Japan series in 2003, Six Sticks, photographed in Omi, Honshu, Japan (above). It is simply 6 lines seemingly floating in a vast canvas, but, upon closer inspection, the sticks are actually coming out of a body of water, and their reflections that create the illusion of floating are just blurred enough to bring you back to reality. In the distance is the softest of lines that hits at a horizon. His compositions draw you in, but the nuances captured in texture and space immerse you into a world unseen. That is one Kenna’s great gifts; he brings the ordinary to extraordinary, capturing a moment or space one might experience a hundred times without ever seeing it.
Written by Dr. Amy Gorman, Curator of Education and New Media

Whether you call it déjà vu, serendipity, or coincidence, we have all had those moments when our experiences echo through different aspects of our lives. What we see in one part of our lives is sure to manifest in another, and nowhere is this phenomenon of manifestation more prevalent than in art.

When we first launched our new blog, we had the great idea to for our staff to contribute by sharing some of their favorite art works and artists. But since different artists choose to create different echoes from varied and meaningful aspects of life, how do you choose just one? Surely you can’t pick only one favorite artist! My mind immediately whirled with possibilities, and certainly in my top 10 artists of all time is Michael Kenna, an extraordinary photographer. As coincidence would have it, Kenna has just released his latest series, based on Thomas Jefferson’s time as a minister to France in Paris!

Jefferson, being an alumnus of William and Mary as well as a Founding Father, is hugely important to the College. Jeffersonian history remains a vital part of the campus today, and of course Swem Special Collections and the Muscarelle Museum have some of the most significant writings and works from or about Jefferson in their archives. Kenna, invited to visually retrace Jefferson’s footsteps in Paris from 1784 to 1789, has contributed his own unique touch by “adding a new visual record to this fascinating chapter in French and American history” in his latest publication, Thomas Jefferson’s Paris Walks.

Kenna’s work produces a calm in an otherwise noisy world. He has reinvented landscape photography by capturing the graceful movements and quiet stills of life simultaneously. His mastery of manipulating the atmosphere when capturing available light often creates a dreamlike quality to his works. While much of his work contains nature, there is often that small imprint that reminds of us of a human presence in the environment. His compositions are always exquisite, but it is in the subtleties of his work that the beauty emerges. One of my favorite pieces is from his Japan series in 2003, Six Sticks, photographed in Omi, Honshu, Japan (above). It is simply 6 lines seemingly floating in a vast canvas, but, upon closer inspection, the sticks are actually coming out of a body of water, and their reflections that create the illusion of floating are just blurred enough to bring you back to reality. In the distance is the softest of lines that hits at a horizon. His compositions draw you in, but the nuances captured in texture and space immerse you into a world unseen. That is one Kenna’s great gifts; he brings the ordinary to extraordinary, capturing a moment or space one might experience a hundred times without ever seeing it.

Written by Dr. Amy Gorman, Curator of Education and New Media

@2 years ago with 92 notes
#Art #Art Museums #Michael Kenna #Muscarelle Museum of Art #William and Mary #Curator's Choice 

Students in the Curating and Connoisseurship seminar arrange pieces in the Museum’s Grand Hallucination exhibit in February, accompanied by Muscarelle Director Aaron De Groft and Chief Curator John Spike.

(Source: wm.edu)

@2 years ago with 1 note
#Muscarelle #Muscarelle Museum of Art #William and Mary #Art Museums #Art 
ARTHUR G. DOVE 1880-1946Ice and Clouds, 1931Oil on board, 19 1/2 X 26 3/4” (49.53 X 67.95 cm.)Signed, lower right961-0-134
Arthur Dove, American Modernist and abstract artist, was born today in 1880. Happy Birthday, Arthur!

ARTHUR G. DOVE 1880-1946
Ice and Clouds
1931
Oil on board, 19 1/2 X 26 3/4” (49.53 X 67.95 cm.)
Signed, lower right
961-0-134

Arthur Dove, American Modernist and abstract artist, was born today in 1880. Happy Birthday, Arthur!

@2 years ago
#Arthur Dove #art #art museums #Muscarelle #Muscarelle Museum of Art #William and Mary 

Greek Vases attributed to the Amykos painter, the Nausicaa painter, and the Nikias painter. The Museum will be hosting works from these and other Ancient Greek artists in our Athenian Potters and Painters exhibit, which opens August 18th!

(Source: metmuseum.org)

@2 years ago
#Greek vases #Ancient Greece #art #art museums #William and Mary #Muscarelle #Muscarelle Museum of Art #Greece 
The discovery of this Georgia O’Keeffe painting hanging unprotected on William and Mary’s campus is what sparked the idea of a campus art museum. Check out our official website to learn more about the founding of the Muscarelle!

The discovery of this Georgia O’Keeffe painting hanging unprotected on William and Mary’s campus is what sparked the idea of a campus art museum. Check out our official website to learn more about the founding of the Muscarelle!

@2 years ago with 4 notes
#About Us #Art #Art Museums #Georgia O'Keeffe #Muscarelle Museum of Art #William and Mary 
Welcome to the Tumblr for the Muscarelle Museum of Art, located at the College of William and Mary. We hope to officially launch our Tumblog this summer, so stay tuned! In the mean time, check out our other social media sites under our "Connect with Us" page!

Welcome to the Tumblr for the Muscarelle Museum of Art, located at the College of William and Mary. We hope to officially launch our Tumblog this summer, so stay tuned! In the mean time, check out our other social media sites under our "Connect with Us" page!

@2 years ago with 9 notes
#Blog News #Hello! #Muscarelle #Muscarelle Museum of Art #William and Mary #Art Museums #Art